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Celia Eberle
updated: 07/11/2010
website: celiaeberle.googlepages.com
 
   
 
 
     
 
Artwork Title
art-medium
art-year
dimensions
Click thumbnails for full view:
 
Marasca
Under Bub
Crown Prince
Endless Hand
Defend Us from Tomorrow
Fashion Forward
Facade
Facade (view 2)
1971
1971 (view 2)
Slag Home
Slag Home (view 2)
Ramparts
Tower
Tower (view 2)
 
Portfolio Keywords:  humor, animals, conceptual, domestic, consumer culture, historical, craft, erotic, kitsch, violence
 
 
Marasca by Celia Eberle
Marasca
collage on paper
2010
11" x  15" 
Under Bub by Celia Eberle
Under Bub
collage on paper
2010
9" x  12" 
Crown Prince by Celia Eberle
Crown Prince
collage on paper
2010
15" x  11" 
Endless Hand by Celia Eberle
Endless Hand
collage on paper
2010
11 " x  8 " 
Defend Us from Tomorrow by Celia Eberle
Defend Us from Tomorrow
collage on paper
2010
9 " x  12 " 
Fashion Forward by Celia Eberle
Fashion Forward
collage on paper
2010
9.5 " x  13.5 " 
Facade by Celia Eberle
Facade
bone, concrete block
2010
11.5 " x  7.75 "  x 2.5 " 
Facade (view 2) by Celia Eberle
Facade (view 2)
bone, concrete block
2010
11.5 " x  7.75 "  x 2 " 
1971 by Celia Eberle
1971
Persian marble, bone, car emblem
2010
21.5 " x  6.5 "  x 5 " 
1971 (view 2) by Celia Eberle
1971 (view 2)
Persian marble, bone, car emblem
2010
21.5 " x  6.5 "  x 5 " 
Slag Home by Celia Eberle
Slag Home
industrial slag, metal, bone
2010
30 " x  12 "  x 9 " 
Slag Home (view 2) by Celia Eberle
Slag Home (view 2)
industrial slag, metal, bone
2010
30" x  12"  x 9" 
Ramparts by Celia Eberle
Ramparts
bone mounted on wood
2009
11" x  25"  x 3" 
Tower by Celia Eberle
Tower
bone, clay, wood
2009
9.5" x  7"  x 6" 
Tower (view 2) by Celia Eberle
Tower (view 2)
bone, clay, wood
2009
9.5" x  7"  x 6" 

Artist Statement



    These are artifacts from a culture that assumes there is no difference between past, present and future. Basic needs and desires, and all that is associated with them, remain constant. This practical and philosophical position provides a viewpoint through which to construct or position the imagery, filtered through a sense of resignation tinged with humor.

    By placing appropriated images in another context while elevating created images to the same plane, I am imagining a perspective outside normative attitudes concerning progress, technology and the environment. This is the “culture” I have affected. Referencing the work as “artifacts” or “fake artifacts” is intended to emphasize the illusion of multiple hands and approaches, multiple sources and time frames. This opens the door to the pursuit of meaning on many levels and allows for a collision of  materials and methods. The use of traditional materials mimics historicity. The use of flotsam proffers immediate recognition.


Celia Eberle
2008

   

Artist Bio / CV
Celia Eberle considers herself an observer, having lived in small towns all her life. Her professional record spans nearly twenty years with work that has frequently garnered critical attention. She has had ten solo exhibits and has been included in sixteen juried or curated exhibits in the last ten years. Her work is included in Texas Artists Today, Marquand Books, 2010. In 2007, she completed a residency in sculpture at the School of Visual Arts, New York. She was also awarded a residency at the Commerce Street Artists Warehouse in Houston in 2005. Other awards include the Otis and Velma Dozier Travel Grant from the Dallas Museum of Art in 2002, a Merit Award from the Friends of the Contemporary Artists Center, North Adams, Massachusetts in 1996, and an M-AA/NEA Fellowship in 1994. She was honored with nominations for the Arthouse Texas Prize in 2005 and 2007.
 
Born and educated in Texas, Celia was awarded a scholarship by the Texas Fine Arts Association (now Arthouse) in high school. She was a member of the historic 500X cooperative gallery of Dallas from 1987 to 1991.

Some of Eberle’s installations have invited audience participation. On different occasions she has created a large, two-story maze representing the bowels of god, a tongue-shaped lounge chair, and a giant paw that can be worn over the body. Her current choice of carving stone, bone and other traditional materials, often combined with found objects, dovetails with her pursuit of immutability within the human experience.