My Account My Lightboxes Create Account Submissions Guidelines Help
[ ARTIST ARCHIVE ]
  ARTIST PORTFOLIO  
 
Deborah Aschheim
updated: 10/21/2010
website: www.deborahaschheim.com
 
   
 
 
     
 
Artwork Title
art-medium
art-year
dimensions
Click thumbnails for full view:
 
Encounter (The Theme Building so beautiful encased in scaffolding)
Theme Building no. 2 (she said, how I felt about flying when I was a little girl)
Encounter no. 4 (observation of the lunch waiters)
Chandler no. 2, (Mom in front of buildings you can’t see anymore, Los Angeles 1968)
Capital ( I see again in memory like a dream)
Two columbus (Surprised how much I miss the lollipops)
Tent of Tomorrow (We rode the subway all the way to Flushing Corona Meadows)
Unisphere (I see in my mind Mom in front of it looking like Jackie Kennedy)
Ambassador (trespassing through ghost buildings of the abandoned Christian college)
Nakagin, (People hated living in the cramped capsules, though)
nostalgia for the future:prentice
Needle (in my dream erased by a cloud of scaffolding, receding into the overcast Seattle sky )
nostalgia for the future
encounter
tent of tomorrow
 
Portfolio Keywords:  architecture, autobiographical, systems, conceptual, site-specific, memory, information, mapping, narrative, science
 
 
Encounter (The Theme Building so beautiful encased in scaffolding)  by Deborah Aschheim
Encounter (The Theme Building so beautiful encased in scaffolding)
ink on duralar
2009
36 " x  24 " 
Theme Building no. 2 (she said, how I felt about flying when I was a little girl)  by Deborah Aschheim
Theme Building no. 2 (she said, how I felt about flying when I was a little girl)
Ink on Duralar
2010
38"" x  25"" 
Encounter no. 4 (observation of the lunch waiters) by Deborah Aschheim
Encounter no. 4 (observation of the lunch waiters)
Ink on Duralar
2010
20 " x  51 " 
Chandler no. 2, (Mom in front of buildings you can’t see anymore, Los Angeles 1968)  by Deborah Aschheim
Chandler no. 2, (Mom in front of buildings you can’t see anymore, Los Angeles 1968)
ink on duralar
2010
25" x  20" 
Capital ( I see again in memory like a dream) by Deborah Aschheim
Capital ( I see again in memory like a dream)
ink and acrylic on plastic
2010
72 " x  48 "  x 2 " 
Two columbus (Surprised how much I miss the lollipops) by Deborah Aschheim
Two columbus (Surprised how much I miss the lollipops)
ink, gesso on duralar
2009
36 " x  24 " 
Tent of Tomorrow (We rode the subway all the way to Flushing Corona Meadows) by Deborah Aschheim
Tent of Tomorrow (We rode the subway all the way to Flushing Corona Meadows)
ink and acrylic on duralar
2009
24 " x  40 " 
Unisphere (I see in my mind Mom in front of it looking like Jackie Kennedy) by Deborah Aschheim
Unisphere (I see in my mind Mom in front of it looking like Jackie Kennedy)
ink and acrylic on duralar
2009
24 " x  36 " 
Ambassador (trespassing through ghost buildings of the abandoned Christian college) by Deborah Aschheim
Ambassador (trespassing through ghost buildings of the abandoned Christian college)
ink on duralar
2009
24 " x  36 " 
Nakagin, (People hated living in the cramped capsules, though)  by Deborah Aschheim
Nakagin, (People hated living in the cramped capsules, though)
ink on duralar
2009
25 " x  24 " 
nostalgia for the future:prentice by Deborah Aschheim
nostalgia for the future:prentice
ink and gesso on duralar
2009
24 " x  36 " 
Needle (in my dream erased by a cloud of scaffolding, receding into the overcast Seattle sky ) by Deborah Aschheim
Needle (in my dream erased by a cloud of scaffolding, receding into the overcast Seattle sky )
ink and gesso on duralar
2009
36 " x  24 " 
nostalgia for the future by Deborah Aschheim
nostalgia for the future
installation with plastic, light, video, sound
2009
Dimensions variable
encounter by Deborah Aschheim
encounter
plastic, LED's
2009
28 " x  44 "  x 44 " 
tent of tomorrow by Deborah Aschheim
tent of tomorrow
plastic, LED's
2009
20" x  30"  x 40" 

Artist Statement

Deborah Aschheim: Nostalgia for the Future

 

Lately I have been thinking about memory and place and the idea of the future.  When I was growing up, the future was limitless possibility, jet-age, space-age techno-utopia. “Modern” meant new. Now, modern means old and the future I grew up seems dated, irresponsible, obsolete.

 

I miss the old future and newness of the modern buildings that are old now.

 

The obsolete future is inscribed in the landscape of the cities where I spend my days and nights.  Certain idiosyncratic, semi-iconic mid-1960’s buildings evoke in me an almost overwhelming nostalgia for the future that didn’t happen- some un-minimalist Edward Durrell Stone buildings, Bertrand Goldberg’s public housing projects for Chicago, the few built examples from the Japanese Metabolist movement.

 

Some of these monuments to the future that didn’t happen have already been torn down, or renovated beyond recognition.  Some, like Philip Johnson’s Tent of Tomorrow, built in Queens, NY, for the 1964 World’s Fair, are in virtual ruin (this site is on the world monuments watch list,) while others inspire dramatic battles between preservationists and developers.  That is not what it is about for me.

 

When I encounter these endangered or ruined monuments to the future from the past, gutted or restored or covered in scaffolding, I am moved beyond anything I can explain. I have a feeling of time travel. I feel sentimental about buildings I am not sure I would have liked when they were new.

 

I have been urgently seeking out the buildings, flying and driving and taking trains to them before they are erased. I don’t want to go inside the buildings.  I circle them, trying to understand them before they are removed or renovated into the present.  It is a strange way to feel about architecture.  I am drawing them and building them, somewhat inaccurately and not to scale, entombed in imaginary scaffolding.

 

I am the same age as the buildings. It is a kind of self-portrait.

Artist Bio / CV

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010 Nostalgia for the Future, Edward Cella Art and Architecture, Los Angeles, CA

2008 Deborah Aschheim, Pasadena Museum of California Art, CA
Deborah Aschheim, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, MO
2007 The Forgetting Curve, University of Southern Maine, Gorham, ME
2006-7 On Memory, Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, PA
2005 Neural Architecture, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN
Neural Architecture no.5, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, CA
2004 Panopticon,(neural architecture no.4) Ben Maltz Gallery
Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, CA
Neural Architecture (a smart building is a nervous building)
Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, CA
2003-4 Arborization, Euston Road, TwoTen Gallery and Contemporary Initiatives
The Wellcome Trust, London, England, UK
2001 Osmosis, Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center, Buffalo, NY
2000 Intergel, City Gallery, Atlanta, GA
Evenflow, Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum, Santa Barbara, CA
Evenflow, Suyama Space, Seattle, WA
GROUP EXHIBITIONS

Installations Inside/Out, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, CA

2008 The Lining of Forgetting, Weatherspoon Art Museum
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
2004 Suspension: Sonic Absorption (Eavesdropping network)
Consolidated Works, Seattle, WA
2003 C.O.L.A. 2003 (Neural Architecture installation), Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery,Los Angeles, CA
2002 Out Of True,(Audition,)University Art Museum, UC Santa Barbara, CA
Beelden Buiten 2002:Fractals (Arborization),Tuin De Brabandere,
2002 New Works, New Spaces,(Retina) Armory Center, Pasadena, CA
1998-9 Spore/Virus Installation, DeCordova Museum, Lincoln, MA
1997 Invitational '97 Knoedler & Company, New York, NY
HONORS, AWARDS
2007 Artist-in-Residence, McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, NC
2006 Residency, Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, CA
2004 Artists’ Resources for Completion Grant,, The Durfee Foundation, L.A., CA
2002-3 City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Fellowship, L.A., CA
2001 Individual Artist Fellowship, New Jersey State Council on the Arts
EDUCATION
1990 University of Washington, Seattle, WA, MFA, Sculpture
1986 Brown University, Providence, RI, BA, Honors Anthropology, Studio Art